Chakra Panel

In Sanskrit the word chakra means "wheel" or "disk.” Each panel is my interpretation of the sevenfold chakra system contained in the human body. This chakra panel begins as a blank slate of white rayon fabric which is washed before any art work is started.  The panel is screen-printed with a stencil that I designed to represent the chakra's movement in a clockwise direction.  Once this first application of screen-printing dries it's ironed to set it permanently.

The dyes for all seven chakras are prepared and then hand-painted onto the rayon. The dyes batch for twenty-four hours, this is the time needed for the colors to be their brightest.  The panel is washed to remove excess dye. Soy wax is applied to preserve the individual colors of all seven chakras before hand-painting the background color of the panel.  Twenty-four hours is needed for the background color to batch properly.  The panel is washed and ironed again before the chakra symbols are hand-painted.

Before I begin hand-painting the chakra symbols I meditate for a short period to collect and ground my energy.  I am attuned to Reiki and consciously use this healing energy as I hand-paint the dyes and chakra symbols.

Measurements: 
13" (width) x 75"( length)

Each chakra panel is mounted on a dowel with a gold ribbon for easy hanging. There is a dowel placed at the base of the panel too. Each panel is infused with Reiki energy and has its own energetic frequency.   Currently this chakra panel is available with the light turquoise background color. 

Thoughts on Color Therapy

Color is a factor that affects every aspect of our daily lives: the clothes you wear, the food you eat, the colors in your home or office, and your emotions.  Are you aware of your mood in the morning as you reach into the closet to assemble your wardrobe for the day?  For most women, it’s about coordinating the colors of the dress or outfit and the accessories.  For men it’s a simple question of matching the shirt and tie.  If you wear a uniform your wardrobe has been dictated for you, but you still have a choice in selecting the light or dark colored jacket, hat, scarf or purse. 

 

Do you think about the colors you wear or gravitate towards?  What are your favorite colors?  Are there certain colors you avoid because you feel uncomfortable wearing them?  I think most people feel safe and comfortable in neutral colors.  Neutral colors allow you to blend in with the crowd, not attracting attention to yourself.  As you go about your daily routine of commuting to work, grocery shopping, or running errands, you can’t help but notice a person wearing bright colors.   It takes a certain level of confidence to pull off wearing yellow, turquoise or a bright green.  

 

Yellow

 

Yellow is a bright color that reminds us of the sun.  If you are experiencing depression, yellow is a color that can help lift your spirits.  Sometimes I find myself gravitating towards certain colors to help me navigate any current issues in my life.  Whenever I see yellow or wear it, I am inspired to create and take action to bring my ideas to fruition.  

 

Turquoise 

 

Turquoise is an amazing color, I love it.  It supports creativity, self-expression and healthy communication.  For instance, when I need extra help with my creativity I wear my turquoise scarf.  Usually light blue is the color associated with the throat chakra, but in my experience turquoise provides the support one needs for creative expression.

 

Green

 

Green is the color usually associated with the heart chakra.  Recently I’ve become mindful that I need to be more loving or kind in my thoughts and actions towards others.  I find that wearing a green scarf or blouse is a physical reminder that it’s possible to speak or act from the heart. I ask myself, what am I trying to create?  What is my intention with my art?  What is my intention with this person?  Your intention is important and can be a powerful trigger for change.

Fabric Heart

My heart is colorful: 

it’s red,

it’s blue,

it’s green,

it’s yellow,

and gold

 

It’s a mixed bag of colors

A mixed bag of emotions

Sometimes its sparkles

Sometimes it shines

Sometimes it shuts down 

And goes on vacation

My heart has nooks and cranies

Uneven bevels cover the surface

Mod-podge is added to seal the 

surface of the fabric heart

To protect it from the elements

Love is the sealant for my human heart 

Protecting it from the ups and downs of life

Inner Critic vs. The Intern

At the beginning of this year I set the bar very high.  I thought completing my short-term goals within a certain timeframe would be a cinch.  Ha, what was I thinking? Every time I step out of my comfort zone, I hear the voice of the inner critic acknowledging all of my mistakes.  Why can’t I give myself permission to make mistakes as I learn new things? 

 

As an artist, I’ve hit many walls on the road to discovering and nourishing my creativity.  When the inner critic rears its ugly head the angst I feel is multiplied and I’m at war with myself. I’m tired of the inner critic kicking my butt and telling me that my ideas aren’t good.  I’ve had enough, I’m firing the inner critic!

 

After graduating from the Art Cloth Mastery Program based in San Antonio, Texas in March of 2012, I thought about hiring a coach.  I needed help to work thru my fears and doubts about moving forward as an artist.  I worked with a creativity coach, Laurie, who is a fiber artist as well.  I was intuitively aware of my internal blocks.  In a span of a few months I learned practical steps to overcome them.

 

During our coaching sessions Laurie would share her practical wisdom.  As I discussed my goals and plans with her, she would recommend guidelines for goal setting that were simple and effective.  The plan needed to be simple, doable and executable with a specific deadline.  

 

I was forced to be honest with myself.  I had to find the balance between my goals and what I could realistically expect of myself given my time constraints.  I’m a one woman show, I don’t own a hive of worker bees dyeing, sewing and creating on my command.

 

For most of my life, success was defined by the results.  I found that in the midst of writing my plan and being a good taskmaster my definition of success began to change.  What if I show up to the event with an inventory of tie-dye t-shirts, scarves, canvas bags and an appealing booth display and it still flops?  What if I don’t sell any t-shirts?  Does this mean I’ve failed?  Am I only successful if I sell my mixed media art?

 

Instead of having fun, I would catch myself obsessing and worrying about the results.  “What if I don’t sell any t-shirts?  What if no one likes the original, one-of-a-kind hand-dyed bags I’ve designed?”  I had allowed my mind to be hijacked by fear.   At this point the inner critic was relentless with the barrage of negative comments.  The inner critic wouldn’t let me rest!

 

During our phone consultations, Laurie recommended a few tips to bring myself back to the present.  She suggested that I wear a bracelet as a physical reminder to have fun and enjoy the process.  We also talked about  detachment.  I was familiar with the process of detachment and sometimes I’ve applied this principle to my life.  Unfortunately when my inner critic is kicking my butt it’s difficult to detach my emotions from the situation as it unfolds. 

 

Laurie also advised me to journal about the inner critic and creative ways to deal with my dilemma.  After a few journal entries the intern persona was born.  I even wrote little notes to myself that I posted in my apartment about firing the inner critic and hiring an intern to do the grunt work.

 

I had an intern to do the dirty work.  By definition the intern’s position was unpaid, but the intern was now empowered to set the pace of the workload.  Whenever the inner critic would rear its ugly head the intern could dangle the threat of quitting.  Ha!  Score 1 point for the intern and 0 points for the inner critic.  

 

Somehow, knowing that I didn’t have to kowtow to the inner critic, provided the mental relief that I needed to move forward.  The inner critic and the intern represent different aspects of my artist persona.  Can I let go and be less rigid with myself?  Can I be less critical of others and myself?  Can I be more playful?  The inner critic versus the intern, which side are you on?